T-Shirt Upcyle With Peace Sign Patches

Patches add a quirky twist to an otherwise dull and casual t-shirt. (photos by Bob Farley)

If you are like me, you probably have a drawer full of t-shirts that you never wear. If they are too big, too long, or the wrong neckline, but the right color, don’t get rid of them. Make a few adjustments and add a little flair to them to make great hiking, lounging, or sleeping shirts. Save them, gather them up on a rainy day, and turn them into comfortable scoop-neck shirts by cutting off all of the uncomfortable bits and embellishing the t-shirts with handmade patches.

For this project, I chose a peace sign. My base layers are made from t-shirt material in varying colors (from other shirts I’ve cut the sleeves off of). For the finishing touches and to complete the peace sign, I’ll add a lightweight printed cotton on top of these base layers.

This three-step process is easiest for t-shirts with small logos on the front. 

Step 1 – Cut off the neck, sleeve and waist bands. If the shirt is a good quality t-shirt, the cotton will roll and soften as it is laundered, and will wear well with age.

Step 2 – Cut out the patch pieces. Pick your symbols, make a pattern if you need to, and cut out all of the parts.

Step 3 – Starting with the base layer, sew your layers on one at a time with a straight stitch and contrasting thread. Try several colors of thread for each layer for added dimension.

 

Happy patching. Peace out.

Below, find a few more fun ways you can upcycle old t-shirts into cute clothes.

2 Responses

  1. printed patches says:

    thanks for sharing this information. its a nice post and keep it always…..

    printed patches

  2. David says:

    Great and very excellent way to upcyle with peace sign patches and I hope that if I will try it at my home then I will surely able to make my old T-shirt new. Thanks :)

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About Michelle Reynolds 

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I’m a slipcover maker who refuses to fill the trash with the cutaway bits of designer fabrics, so I strive to make use of every scrap. I live with my ...

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