Using Pea Greens in Flower Arrangements

pea greens and tulips in a vase

(Photo by Derek R. Trimble)

As mentioned in my post about preserving mustard greens, I’ve been moving garden sites this spring from a temporary garden at a rental place to a permanent spot at a new house. I planted peas, as well as onions and strawberries, early in the spring, and the pea plants had just gotten a foot or so tall when it was time to move on. Rather than cut my losses on these pretty little pea plants, with the pods just starting to form, I harvested them and quickly found a few ways to use the pea shoots.

pea shoots in the garden

These pea plants were about a foot tall when it was time to harvest our temporary garden and move to the next one.

First up was cooking the pea shoots like any other greens, and they were indeed very tasty when sautéed with some sesame oil. I also tried the pea shoots raw in a salad. They lend a flavor much like fully formed pea pods, only they’re a little grassier and the stems can be rather tough. But two meals involving pea shoots was really enough for one week, so I took the rest of the harvest and—because I just can’t let anything go to waste—stuck it in a vase with a few tulips. I was so pleasantly surprised at the lovely look I’d stumbled upon. Um, hello, look at how beautiful this is!

pea shoots and tulips in a brown case

(Photo by Derek R. Trimble)

I don’t want to be too proud of myself, but I looked around quickly online and haven’t found other places where pea greens were used as filler in flower arrangements. And if you can’t find it online, then it doesn’t exist, right? I feel like I’ve stumbled upon the next big thing in edible arrangements. First, it was artichokes, then cabbages, and now, maybe it’s peas. I would love to use the greens in a spring wedding bouquet. Or maybe wait until the peas have already formed to add a little more texture to the arrangement, though only a crazy person would sacrifice a fresh garden pea to an arrangement.

pea pods starting to form on a pea plant

This pea pod was just starting to form when I had to yank the plants from our temporary garden.

And now that I think about it, maybe that’s why no one’s ever done this before. After all, growing edible plants is really all about eating them … or is it? What do you think of using pea greens in flower arrangements?

If you love peas, here’s some more advice for growing peas in your garden:

• Planting and Growing Peas

How to Build a Trellis for Peas

Controlling Pests on Pea Plants

2 Responses

  1. AsharSeo says:

    hello!! Very interesting discussion glad that I came across such informative post. Keep up the good work friend. Glad to be part of your net community. grigori diaita

  2. Katharine says:

    I hate peas, so this is the best use I've EVER seen of anything pea-related! :)

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About Kelly Smith Trimble 

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I grow vegetables wherever I can find enough sunlight and forage roadsides and hiking trails for plants that can be used to make natural dyes. You can find both vintage ...

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