Creating An Electric Candlestick

I found the perfect inspiration for my latest project at a local salvage shop, a $1 teak candleholder that had both weight and form and that au natural hardwood appeal that I enjoy filling my home with. The candle holder itself feels incomplete. Surely it was a set at one point, maybe it had additional pieces, like a hurricane surround that sat on its ledge. Forever a mystery.

Anyways, I had a good idea when I saw it, so I paired it with a simple snap-in base socket, and made myself a unique DIY light to brighten my home.

DIY lamp materials.

Keep on reading to see how I made this, and be inspired to create your own!

First things first: As I strategized how to fit this wooden base with electrical fitting, I chose a snap-in candelabra base socket because it’s very narrow, and came with built-in metal “ears” that I knew would help grip the socket into the narrow candlestick hole. It, with its 6-foot cord and switch, only cost $5.

Snap-in chandelier electrical cord.

The lucky candle holder itself was priced at $1 at a local VOA, and as I already said, was the perfect accent for our home whether it was holding a candle or upcycled into something new.

The salvage shop candlestick, from above.

I bored through the hardwood candlestick with a 1″ paddle bit to both widen and deepen the hole which the electrical wire would run within.

Drilling through the candlestick.

With the hole drilled through the length of the wood the cord had a place to run, but I also needed to make space for the cord to bend and run to the wall. The best solution I could come up with was to sand down the base gently using a Dremel with sandpaper attachment. The resulting gouge in the wood accommodates the wire without causing the base to be putting any pressure on the wire at all.

Using the Dremel to create a space to accomodate the wiring.

With the socket base inserted and the metal ears holding it securely in place, the light was fully wired in all of 2 seconds.

Wiring the candlestick lamp.

To accompany the teak frame, I picked up a “vintage style” bulb with classic filament design. While this 2-pack from The Home Depot cost $6 (priced higher than your everyday chandelier lightbulb but at a lower price point than those I found online), the 40 watt bulb itself adds a unique impact and really finishes off the piece.

Filament light bulb found at Home Depot.

And when it’s lit, I can’t help but be attracted to it like a moth. So pretty.

Lit filament chandelier bulb.

What’ve you made lately from common salvage finds?

A vintage inspired teak electric candlestick.

Catching the home improvement bug at an early age, Emily Winters is a now a devoted DIYer living in Rochester, NY. The projects she covers on her blog Merrypad range from painting a wall to building a deck, so it’s only natural she landed at DIYNetwork.com. You can follow Emily on twitter at @merrypad and like her on facebook at facebook.com/merrypad.

10 Responses

  1. [...] note: How great are strung light-filled jars? And last week’s electric candlestick fits right in with the [...]

  2. [...] I created a unique and bright accent for my home. You can see the whole tutorial for yourself in today’s post on DIY Network. [...]

  3. Lisa Aj says:

    Very cool project. Easy and cute.

  4. [...] note: How great are strung light-filled jars? And last week’s electric candlestick fits right in with the [...]

  5. Kari says:

    Cool project. I'd like to see it a step further with some sort of glass lamp surround as mentioned in the article.

  6. Phyllis Woolum says:

    I like to do projects like this

  7. Moodyvega says:

    It's a nice project when you want to create your own base lighting…

  8. [...] I created a unique and bright accent for my home. You can see the whole tutorial for yourself in today's post on DIY Network. [...]

  9. [...] I created a unique and bright accent for my home. You can see the whole tutorial for yourself in today’s post on DIY Network. [...]

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About Emily Fazio 

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I caught the home improvement bug at an early age, and now I'm a full-time DIYer living in Rochester, NY. The projects I cover on my blog Merrypad range ...

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