DIY Network

Blog Cabin

Mar 11

Blog Cabin Buzz: Cabin Cam Update + Google Hangout

Apologies for the inconvenience, but occasionally the cabin cam will go offline. The connectivity on site can be unpredictable at times and we are still trying our best to fix it. I’ll keep you posted on the progress!

In the meantime, check out a brief update from Laurie and Dylan on YouTube >>

dylan and laurie

Mar 1

Friday Construction Update

Blog Cabin 2013 siding installation

Project manager Dylan Eastman says installation of exterior siding continues this week and, as soon as rain ceases at the home site, the south second floor deck will be waterproofed and the adjoining door installed.

Electrical, plumbing, and mechanical rough-ins are ongoing inside the house and insulation will start late next week. “We will be using spray foam in all of our ceilings for increased energy efficiency and to also serve some vaulted ceilings,” says Dylan.

The team has also ordered and is awaiting delivery of flooring, cabinets, plumbing fixtures, tile and paint — all selected by online voters.

Dylan also reports that show producers have been scouting the site and determining their how-to projects for each episode of Blog Cabin 2013. Each crew has left a little something behind for die-hard fans. Have you noticed anything unusual in the Cabin Cam? Hint: Zoom in.

P.S. Take a peek at the latest slideshow, highlighting final framing and window installation.

Feb 22

Friday Construction Update

Blog Cabin 2013 Window Installation

This week at Blog Cabin 2013, says project manager Dylan Eastman, the team installed exterior doors and windows and began the People’s Choice roofing and siding installations. “Now that the house is once again dried in, we will be installing our specialty trades rough-ins and then moving to insulation. Siding will continue through the next week,” he says.

Feb 11

Monday Construction Update

Blog Cabin 2013 Reconstructed Front Porch

Project manager Dylan Eastman provides a short, sweet update of remodeling tasks at the Blog Cabin 2013 home site:

“Last week, the construction crew completed the upper porch gable and installed weather barriers. This week, we will be awaiting the materials you chose in People’s Choice Round 1. On the week of the 18th, we will be installing the siding, windows and roofing. Be sure to check the Cabin Cam to monitor our progress.”

Jan 18

Friday Construction Update

Blog Cabin 2013 Reconstructed Staircase

According to project manager Dylan Eastman, the construction crew at the Blog Cabin 2013 home site completed wall framing and sheathing, poured footings for the porch and began deck framing and interior stair construction this week.

Next week, the team will focus on main roof framing, a task that will transform this charming little cabin.

Jan 15

Building Stronger; Maintaining Character

Blog Cabin 2013 Reframing Process

Today, I share a slideshow packed with images captured during the reframing process. Now’s your chance to take a closer look at the construction process; attention to detail will make all the difference as we proceed with the loving renovation of this historic home. Enjoy!

Jan 7

Starting from Scratch: Why We Reframed

Reframing Blog Cabin 2013

For those who’ve been glued to the Cabin Cam over the last 48 hours, your eyes do not deceive you. We made a decision in the 11th hour to completely reframe Blog Cabin 2013. Why, you ask? Project manager Dylan Eastman and the design/build team deemed wall studs too short, floor joists (previously ceiling joists — a big no-no) too small, roof rafters too small and termite damage beyond repair.

We counted at least six renovations (highlighted in the above photo), which were pieced together and clad inside and out with very forgiving coverings that could be easily patched, caulked and/or renailed as needed. We certainly don’t want the lucky winner of Blog Cabin 2013 to worry about shifting/sagging, cracking walls and the subsequent repair work. To properly install new, efficient roofing, siding, flooring and drywall and achieve code requirement, we had no choice but to replace studs/joists. We could have retained the original studs, but they would have served no structural purpose, as all door and window locations and sizes have changed.

We salvaged wood from the original house and will reuse where we can. Our goal at this time is to maintain the charm and character of the original structure and honor the history of the home and the entire region as we rebuild.

Jan 4

More Interior Construction Details

Blog Cabin 2013 Interior Remodeling Details

Project manager Dylan Eastman shares new details about the home’s interior and discoveries made during the demolition and home lifting:

1. Most of the first floor framing consists of 2 to 3″ wide by 4 to 5″ tall joists that span 12 to 14 feet — not up to modern standards. Further, some additions where somewhat poorly ledgered onto others. To split spans down to no more than 6 feet, the new foundation includes mid-span piers for (4) 2×8 dropped girders.
2. A layer of 4×8 sheet paneling concealed amazing 7/8″ T&G paneling. The original paint is flaking off the original paneling to reveal a wonderful patina and wood grain; the unpainted area marks the location of original chair rail trim, installed in line with the window sills.
3. A traditional framing technique, studs were installed at the edges of doors and windows. Horizontal infill nailers were then installed to attach the exterior sheathing and interior paneling to the studs.
4. Most of the termite damage occurred around leaky windows and doors.
5. Pieces of trim were dismantled over the years to repair storm-damaged walls. Trim was labeled and then reinstalled.
6. To gain ceiling height and bring the house up to current 130 mph wind loads, the roof will be rebuilt 2’6” higher. Wood from the original roof will be salvaged.

Dec 21

Something Old Attached to Something New

Blog Cabin 2013 original first floor

Wondering where the original first floor ends and additions begin? Project manager Dylan Eastman doctored photos to show you just that. And don’t worry: We’ve got plans for that battered dock!

Dec 18

Additions, Subtracted

Today I am happy to share a new slideshow, created with photos and notes shared by our man on the scene, project manager Dylan Eastman. He explains why certain additions had to be removed and what we plan to do with the salvaged material from those spaces. Take a peek at the photos and share your thoughts below.

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About

Blog Cabin is the groundbreaking multimedia experience based on a very simple idea: You Design It, We Build It, You Could Win It! This truly interactive series asks Internet users to vote on the design features for a real vacation getaway. Expert hosts from DIY Network series will be on hand to rebuild the 1920s lakeside house that will become a luxurious home for a lucky sweepstakes winner. Plus, a one-hour Blog Cabin special, hosted by tool expert Chris Grundy, will highlight the incredible transformation.
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