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Blog Cabin

Nov 1

Standing Up to Superstorm Sandy

Blog Cabin 2013 Hurricane Sandy

Blog Cabin 2013 was lifted in preparation for the construction of a new, sturdy foundation. And then news of Superstorm Sandy hit the airwaves. Before the hurricane came ashore with tropical storm-force winds, the Blog Cabin 2013 general contractor strapped the home down to the ground and then built a sand berm around the structure to keep tidal waters from washing away the cribbings. Sandy moved inland, leaving our circa-1892 coastal cottage virtually unscathed.

Take a few moments to watch the amazing time-lapse video of the home lifting process and discover more about the history of this fascinating coastal North Carolina home, lovingly cared for and tended by members of the Robinson family.


  • Posted at 10:40 am on November 11, 2012
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409 Comments

  1. What a video!

    Trish on November 5, 2012 at 2:42 pm
  2. Thanks for sharing this!! I remember when the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse had to move and watching it–this was just as amazing as it.

    sandra on November 5, 2012 at 4:54 pm
  3. OK so now I am really east coast home sick! This is the second closest to HOME after the Susan, VA home and I need it! DIY will, as usual, only do the best, use the best, video and document the best and ultimately provide a lucky follower with THE BEST HOME EVER – heck with vacation retreat, well maybe for other friends and family , I'd be livin there full time! My Nevada Mustang and "no cow sense" appaloosa would have friends visiting, grass that they've never seen and a whole new life. The dogs may have to contend with fleas but…… Nice to see a lot of the usual brilliantly minded bloggers here again – all of you have such great ideas to add to the genius of the DIY planners!

    Jacqui L. on November 5, 2012 at 6:52 pm
  4. My personal favorites are definately Clives porch and extended second floor, a wrap around porch is a must anywhere on the east coast, keep the fireplace, sprinkler system makes great sense, the pier and a boat/fishing/gathering place, a greenhouse for we year round organic growers, a second floor bathroom, handicap access to the second floor would be awesome, fencing the property and adding an automatic gate would be nice (I know what wild horses can do to landscaping!) and storage in all that space under the raised foundation is a must . As for the interior – OMG – the family would be nuts to leave their antiques and collectibles but if they did, God bless them and DIY for talking them into it! How adorable, coastal and comforting was this HOME as shown in the photos!

    Jacqui L. on November 5, 2012 at 6:54 pm
  5. I am so homesick right now – can ya'll tell? I am writing this from the desert in Nevada which I have tried to turn into a 5 acre property resembling Virginia! With family and friends from Chesterfield and Henrico counties and in every town down to Virginia Beach and having vacationed with friends at Atlantic Beach, I want to come home to a place that will acommodate my every wish!!!!! I care for people with disabilities in my home so wouyldn't this be the serenity of all homes for myself and say 2-3 others? I don't post a lot but I do want to wish everyone the best in their dreams and may this home become the reality for some very lucky person! Blessed Be to all of you bloggers and safety and fun to all of you at DIY for giving we struggling folks something to dream about!

    Jacqui L. on November 5, 2012 at 6:55 pm
  6. I see they ripped off the screened in porch when they raised the house. I hope they PUT IT BACK ON!!!!

    flashy on November 5, 2012 at 8:24 pm
  7. So glad the lifting was done before the storm arrived and further measures were taken to protect the home.I'm looking forward to seeing all the changes and know a very blessed family will enjoy this home again. The history was interesting. Looking forward to more! Thank you!

    Susan on November 6, 2012 at 12:23 am
  8. The blog cabin would be wonderful if it was modern enough to be comfortable , yet maintained the interior and exterior characteristics that add to the historical integrity of this wonderful 1890's house. <3

    bythebaydreamer on November 6, 2012 at 9:51 am
  9. Someone said that Shake shingles was a common siding in this area, they are out lawed in Utah and I know parts of Calif. where ever there are wildfires, even next to the ocean. So does that mean that it is very humid in NC and the shakes don't catch fire?

    vicki_in_Utah on November 6, 2012 at 10:57 am
    • Unfortunately, cedar shingles burn equally well in dry or humid conditions. The older they are the more flammable they are. The only fdifference between dry and humid regions is ther is lowerr environmental fire risk in humid regions. Once alight the wood burns just the same. :(

      If the desire is to have the rustic cabin look (& feel) but have a much stronger, durable, storm resistant, maintenance free siding maybe they could consider using HardiSiding. :)

      Clive on November 6, 2012 at 12:38 pm
    • Thanks Clive, so are there brick homes in NC? it seems there would be.

      vicki_in_Utah on November 6, 2012 at 1:29 pm
    • I expect they have every type of cladding on houses in NC. Certainly there's plenty of brick inland in regions I know well.

      I'm intrigued, do you think the cabin should have a brick exterior?

      Clive on November 6, 2012 at 2:33 pm
    • hi vicki–i think the choices will be driven by the project sponsors, don't you ? So far they have used the same siding company for the past 3 B C s. The material is supposed to be impervious to that coastal weather, temperature extremes, mold, insect damage and fire proof ( James Hardie siding). My guess is that they will use Hardie siding again ? The Maine home did have a shingled effect up by the eaves ( gables ? ) B)

      LLColeman on November 7, 2012 at 3:42 am
    • That's true LLColeman, the same thing with the flooring. Hasn't it been Lumber Liquidators?

      vicki_in_Utah on November 7, 2012 at 9:45 am
  10. What a blessing. Wonderful to watch the process of moving a whole house. Raising the cabin when they did saved it from storm damage. We went through Hurricane Andrew in Miami and know what water can do. What a delightful story of the family and old cabin's history.

    Pearl Dunn on November 6, 2012 at 5:31 pm

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Blog Cabin is the groundbreaking multimedia experience based on a very simple idea: You Design It, We Build It, You Could Win It! This truly interactive series asks Internet users to vote on the design features for a real vacation getaway. Expert hosts from DIY Network series will be on hand to rebuild the 1920s lakeside house that will become a luxurious home for a lucky sweepstakes winner. Plus, a one-hour Blog Cabin special, hosted by tool expert Chris Grundy, will highlight the incredible transformation.
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